The Two CreateSpaces. CreateSpace Pro for Publishers and CreateSpace Lite for Indies.

amazon-print-on-demand

Amazon Print-On-Demand? Meet CreateSpace Pro. Is POD-Select Exclusivity On the Cards?

During the Amazon-Hachette spat one of Amazon’s tactics was to push for Hachette and other publishers to use Amazon’s POD system, making sure all books were perma-available.

Needless to say Hachette didn’t go down this route, but rest assured trad pub big and small is looking closely at, and investing in, what we loosely call POD, and as the costs come down so more and more print production will shift to this model.

It’s a bizarre irony that the technology supposedly killing print will end up being its saviour. More on that in another post.

Here to take a look at Amazon Print On Demand and how it differs from CreateSpace.

Basically, if you’re an indie author you’re not welcome. Amazon POD is a business venture for publishers, and indie authors trying to get in on the act will be shuffled off to the regular CreateSpace site as per the sidebar. (LINK)

Amazon ram home the point that we are not “publishers”here. (LINK)

From FAQs:

19. I am an author and I want to self-publish, can I take advantage of Print-On-Demand to publish my novel?
The information on this website is intended for publishers, however Amazon does offer Print-On-Demand services for authors who want to self-publish. Please visit (CreateSpace) for more information.

And yes, Amazon does go on to explain the difference. One key difference being Amazon give publishers “exclusive benefits” not available to us small-fry.

Q 20. What is the difference between CreateSpace and Print-On-Demand?

CreateSpace is the platform through which both independent authors and publishers using POD can upload and manage their titles.

“The key difference between the two services is that Print-On-Demand offers benefits that are exclusive to publishers, including managed accounts, flexible uploading options and additional solutions for your titles.”

As ever, it’s Amazon’s business and they set the rules.

CreateSpace still offers indies great way to get our books into print and we’d be crazy not to be using CreateSpace as part of our “going wide” strategy.

But there are plenty of other options, like Ingram, and now StreetLib’s POS print-on-demand service has dropped its upfront fees that could be well worth exploring further.

Bottom line is, print is not going to fade into oblivion any time soon. Just the opposite. Continuing improvements and cost efficiency will make digital printing more and more central to publishers whatever our size.

And with Amazon’s drive to get more publishers using CreateSpace with the professional publisher option, the print arena is about to get a whole lot more competitive.

Many of us are seeing our CreateSpace titles appear in our KDP dashboard, and I would expect that to continue apace until all KDP authors have the KDP-CreateSpace set-up available.

CreateSpace itself will no doubt become a professional-publishers only site.

No idea yet what sort of royalties pro-publishers will get compared to us indies in CreateSpace Lite. Looks like we need to be signed up to get that sort of information.

Meantime don’t be surprised if Amazon starts offering an exclusive POD-Select option, whereby we indies can get some sort of extra benefits by eschewing Ingram, StreetLib POS and all the myriad other POD options competing with CreateSpace, and have our print titles available solely through Amazon.

This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group. (LINK)

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Would You Say No To 90%+ Royalties? Maybe You Already Are.

Would You Say No To 90%+ Royalties? Maybe You Already Are.

shopify

D2C and 96% Royalties. Get Started Direct2Consumer With Shopify Lite.

Shopify just deposited £9.58 in my bank.

Nothing to get excited about on its own, but when you consider it was for a five-ebook package, each individually selling at £1.99 (GBP) on Amazon, it gets more interesting.

On Amazon those five (children’s) books would have cost the buyer £1.99 x 5 = £9.95. I sell them as a pack of five (not a box set – some people prefer individual titles because they are easier to navigate and to share among the children) for a clean £10.

On Amazon each sale would net me 35% of the £1.99 each, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale was made. That’s 0.70 a shot x 5 making a total royalty for the five books of £3.50 coming to me. Amazon would have taken £6.50 for brokering the deal.

Instead Shopify landed £9.58 in my UK account just four working days after the transaction. (3 days for US and Australia, 7 days for Canada.) That’s £6.08 *more* than the same sale would have got me on Amazon.

And for those wondering, that’s a 96% royalty rate.

Even for a higher priced item where Amazon paid the 70% royalty (minus the delivery charge) that’s still upwards of 26% less than my direct sale delivered.

Shopify will also let me sell direct on Facebook and Pinterest. Not a promotional link to a retailer but a direct sales button.

And of course I can put sales buttons on my website, blog, etc.

There’s a monthly fee of $9 for Shopify Lite, which lets us do all the above.

The next step up is the Shopify store, which I plan on experimenting with in 2017. The monthly fee is a little higher, but when we’re collecting 95% of list price that’s no problem to cover if we have the traffic.

Where does the traffic come from? Our mailing lists are one good source. Plus of course we can directly promote our Shopify shop or individual sales links.

The downside of course is chart position on the mighty Amazon. Chart position equals visibility equals sales, as we all know.

But… If we are fielding niche-market titles (my bilinguals, for example), or have back-list titles that are not seeing much chart action anyway, D2C is a great way to maximise profits, and of course we have the customer data to up-sell further goods later.

And having a shop of course means we can bundle items as we like, cross-promote items as we like, and make up our own categories, and add links to retailers too. The latter is always good idea for ebooks because some buyers will want the convenience of, say, Amazon’s one-click.

With a shop (Shopify or whatever) we can also offer loyalty incentives. We can offer subscriptions. We can offer free bonus material. We can run promotions and competitions and special offers and etc, etc.

Yes, these are things we can do on our regular websites, but a well-branded “shop” adds appeal and professionalism for the consumer,.

And a shopping cart system where consumers can load up a basket of goods rather than make an individual purchase then go back and do it all over again.

D2C shouldn’t be seen as trying to compete with, or as an alternative to, the big retailers. But to compliment the sales they bring us, and to build our brand and enlarge out reach.

https://www.shopify.com/lite

Shopify (LINK), like Etsy and Ecwid and Selz and etc will let us load digital content and will take care of everything for us once we have the listings live, so before we protest it’s all too much work it’s actually no different in that respect from loading to Amazon or Kobo.

The big difference is that 95% royalty.

What’s your excuse for not going D2C?

This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group. (LINK)

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For daily news and discussion about the global indie publishing scene join this lively Facebook Group.

How many paperbacks and audio-books will you sell this Christmas?

Christmas Quick Tips → Diversity → Promoting Multiple Formats

I’m delighted, but not at all surprised, to hear how many indies are reporting increasing percentages of their revenue is coming from formats other than ebooks.

With the recent slump in ebook sales on Amazon, now pretty much confirmed by the latest Author Earnings Report, many indies are even reporting revenue from “other formats” is exceeding their ebook revenue.

And it begs the question – would that percentage be even higher if we took time out to take format diversity seriously?

Yes, I know, we indies sell more ebooks than any other format, therefore we should focus on ebooks, blah, blah, blah.

But as I’ve said many times, this is an artificial construction. A corner we have painted ourselves into.

We spend all our time and energy writing and promoting our ebooks, and on those occasions when we do manage to put together a print version or an audio book we mention it once on FB or twitter with an embarrassed smile and the go right back to focussing on our ebooks.

Of course we sell far more ebooks than any other format.

But what if we were to divide our attention more equally across all our formats? What if we tried cross-pollinating our different formats?

For example, how many of us even mention, in our ebook back-matter, that our titles – including, and perhaps especially, the one the reader has open on their device – are also available in print and audio-book versions?

Cross-pollination is essential to our organic growth. Not just of ebooks but of all formats.

Here’s the thing.

When a reader on Amazon loves our ebook they can tweet, FB, email, or otherwise tell all their friends about this great book. Personal recommendation is – or should be – our biggest driver of sales. Word of mouth matters.

But when our Amazon reader tells their friend who uses Kobo or Nook or Apple or Google Play or OverDrive or Scribd or whatever, and that friend rushes to their preferred retailer or digital library or subscription service to get this highly recommended book and finds it’s not available because we’re in Select, or we couldn’t be bothered to get in it digital libraries, or decided subscription services were a waste of time, then we’ve just lost not only that one sale but also the future sales from all the other titles that reader might have bought afterwards.

It works both ways. Our excited Google Play or Apple or OverDrive reader tells their friend using Amazon, Kobo and Nook and they rush off to download our book.

Just to repeat part of that. Our excited Google Play or Apple or OverDrive reader tells their friend using Amazon…

In other words, going wide doesn’t just bring us more sales from other outlets, It also brings us more sales on the Big Gorilla itself.

It’s cross pollination.

Now lets extrapolate this to formats.,

Our ebook reader on Amazon or Kobo or Google Play or wherever loves our book and raves about it to their friends.

But what if that book is only available as an ebook, not in print or audio? Those friends who want to read it in print or listen to it having heard about it on social media are going to be disappointed. We’ve just lost not only the one print or audio-book sale but all the other print and audio sales we might have picked up for our other titles.

But perhaps our excited reader isn’t a social media person but still likes to personally recommend titles to friends and family.

If we have a note in our back-matter saying this books (and others) are available in format X, Y or Z then that reader can make a judgment about who to recommend or indeed buy that other format for.

“I so loved this book and I’m sure Mum would, but she doesn’t read on a screen. It’s Grandpa’s birthday next week and he would love an audio-book. What a shame this book isn’t in audio format. And dear Aunt Nelly is really struggling to find books she’d like that are in large print,but there are so few to choose from…”

Lost sales, folks.

This is particularly important with Christmas approaching.

Yes we can, with some effort, on some retailers, gift ebooks. But seriously, what kind of gift is a digital download? Try wrapping that up with a pretty ribbon and a “love You” tag and popping it under the Xmas tree.

But supposing we have, in our ebooks, a little message at the back saying something like,

“If you enjoyed this book, why not share the pleasure and give the print or audio version as gift to a loved one? Also available in large print.”

For those of us with email lists now is the ideal time to be putting together that email promo reminding our followers that not only our all our titles available in ebook format, but also in print, large print and audio versions that they can give to their friends and family.

But don’t – please, please don’t – just say “It’s available on Amazon” it it’s in fact wide, because you’ll be sending out a clear message to everyone that doesn’t shop at Amazon that the book is not available anywhere else.

List the ISBN (print and audio) and tell folks they can simply Google the ISBN and up will come everywhere the audio or print version is available.

In the USA some 70% of all book sales are in print. And before we roll out the “Life’s so unfair – we indies can’t get into bookstores” excuse again do bear in mind that a) that’s not true, and b) half of all print sales happen online anyway.

Print isn’t dying. Audio-book sales are soaring. Large print is easy to add to our portfolio,and shouldn’t be seen as just for those books that will appeal to mature readers. Lots of younger readers also have challenged vision. (Lots more on large-print opportunities in a future post.).

Amazon’s CreateSpace and ACX aren’t the only options, but they do offer a quick and easy foot in the door for indies wanting to take those first steps into multiple formats.

If we indies aren’t getting a decent share of the print and audio action like trad pub is then, sorry folks, but we have only ourselves to blame.

And sometimes the fixes can be as simple as letting our ebook readers know other formats are available.

As I post this it’s 27th October. Christmas is literally less than eight weeks away. Just enough time to nip in, update our ebook back-matter, update our websites, and send out our newsletters to tell the world we’re not embarrassed to be multi-format and yes, we have regular and large print paperbacks and audio-books available! (And maybe hardbacks and special editions too).

How many print and audio-books will you sell this Christmas?

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This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group.

 

THE INTERNATIONAL INDIE AUTHOR
LOOKING AT THE BIGGER PICTURE.

Wattpad’s Global Data Mine

wattpad-global

Are you making the best of Wattpad’s data tools?

Wattpad is, increasingly, a valuable tool to get actual sales, and I’ll be looking at some of Wattpad’s new sales-orientated features over coming weeks.

But for me Wattpad is most valuable for its global reach and its data.

Take the image above. Obviously this is an inert screenshot, but the original in my Wattpad data dashboard is interactive and a click on each of the highlighted countries will tell me what percentage of my readers are coming from each country.

Wattpad will also break down my readers by gender and by age group, and a lot more besides.

  • This map shows me that for this particular title some 25% of my Wattpad readership is in the US. More than I would have expected, but then this is an English-language title.
  • The UK accounts for 11% and Canada and Australia account for 3% each.

But what matters to me with Wattpad is reaching the rest of the world and, again bearing in mind this is an English-language title, the stats are both revealing and occasionally surprising.

  • In Europe I’m finding readers in Germany and Austria. Surprisingly no traction yet elsewhere in Europe.
  • 10% of my Wattpad readers for this title are in India. That’s very useful to know as I really hadn’t considered India a likely market for this particular book. And 2% in neighbouring Pakistan and 1.5% in Sri Lanka.

But then come the real surprises.

  • Courtesy of Wattpad I’m finding readers in Africa for my English-language title – in South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, Ghana and Nigeria. In fact 5% of my readers for this title are in Nigeria, which gives me something to focus on.
  • In Latin America it’s not great, but I’m finding readers in Brazil and Guyana.

Across Asia it’s looking very promising.

  • The Philippines is delivering fully 10% of my readers, and while there are still far too many white spaces (0%) across Asia I’m doing the happy dance on seeing I’ve found readers in Georgia and Outer Mongolia.

Am I seeing sales from all this? Two points arise.

First, it’s impossible to make a direct link between the Wattpad stats and sales , but I suspect yes, I’m seeing some extra sales. Not many, but a few.

But, to come to point two, that’s not what I use Wattpad for. Wattpad is my route to connect with readers who for whatever reason cannot or are not looking at the big ebook retail stores we mostly rely on.

Wattpad is about finding my future core readers and establishing my brand in far-flung lands.

As per stats, there are clearly a couple of countries where it may pay off to start some focussed promotion. By which I mean focussed brand-building, not buy-my-book marketing, although of course that’s a welcome bonus.

For this particular title 49% of my readers are 13-18 age group and 80% female. Both figures could be higher as about 20% in each case have opted not to give that data. Given the title (YA aimed at girls) the stats are not surprising. A further 25% are 18-25, but I’m getting readers across all age groups.

For this sort of data alone Wattpad is worth setting some time aside, but there is much more to Wattpad than just data, as I’ll be exploring in future posts.

For 2017 I plan on getting ALL my tiles on Wattpad and trying to leverage some of Wattpad’s many promotional tools. More on that soon.

With 45 million users worldwide, and literally one new reader signing up every second of every day, Wattpad is potentially one of our most valuable internationalist-indie tools.

Are you getting the best out of Wattpad?

This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group. See the original post and discussion here. (LINK)

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Other recent posts from the International Indie Author Facebook Group:

Google Play have introduced new discovery features to Google Play Books that might just bring us a few more sales.

With 75 global ebook stores GP is one of our most useful assets for global reach.

While still sadly indifferent to Africa (just South Africa and Egypt), Google Play is a strong player in Latin America, eastern Europe and SE Asia (inc. Thailand, Indonesia,Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Philippines, etc, where Amazon and Apple are not available). .

Anecdotally Google Play is my best bet for sales across Latin America, out-performing Amazon in Brazil and Mexico, and even bringing sales from small countries like El Salvador.

Google Play’s self-pub portal is now closed to newcomers, and we have to be in one of the 75 GPB global countries to even see the store, but we can still get our titles into Google Play Books.

Sadly neither Smashwords nor Draft2Digital can help here, but StreetLib and PublishDrive can, and of course so can the pay-up-front aggregators like Bookbaby and Ebook Partnership.

See the original post and discussion here. (LINK)

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Another One Bites The Dust – Sainsbury Ebooks To Close.

I’ve not heard anything from Sainsbury yet but Kobo are reporting they are hoovering up Sainsbury’s customer base as Sainsbury opts out of the ebook business.

Sainsbury is a significant UK supermarket chain that, along with Tesco, took on the challenge of the UK ebook market.

Tesco fell foul of major issues unrelated to its digital ambitions and had to pull out of peripherals like ebooks.

No word yet as to what triggered the Sainsbury pull-out, but given Amazon UK’s overwhelming dominance of the UK ebook market this is disappointing but not surprising news.

For indies it will make no difference to our Sainsbury sales as Sainsbury was strictly trad-pub only. A handful of indies using Vearsa were there, but for the rest of us it simply was never an option.

This latest UK ebook store failure follows close on the heels of the Waterstone’s surrender. Waterstone’s too handed its ebook clientèle to Kobo. As did Sony UK before that. And of course Nook UK has left us. And somewhere in between Txtr UK left us and Blloon left us.

Apple and Google Play line up with Kobo to keep Amazon from total UK ebook dominance (small players like Blackwells and Hive are neither here nor there. Kobo has both a localized UK store and partners with the high street chain WH Smith.

I wouldn’t be that surprised if WH Smith conceded defeat next.

The sad reality right now is that if an indie has a very strong UK presence and isn’t faring well on other retailers at home or abroad then going KDP Select and focussing on the Amazon UK market would make perfect sense.

No doubt there will be rejoicing on the Zon-centric blogs these next few days (I suspect many are already planning street parties for when B&N goes down) but a healthy market is one with strong competition.

The UK ebook market is as close to an Amazon monopoly as they’ve got anywhere. It’s common sense, not anti-Amazon sentiment, to say this latest UK ebook store closure is not good news.

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India news – from Amar Vyas

Manasi Subramaniam, Commissioning editor and Rights Manager at Harper Collins India, conducted a master class on publishing rights during Publishing Next 2016. During the masterclass, she talked about translations, international rights, film and other rights for books. Manasi also gave examples of how the B2B books rights process works at Book Fairs.

You can listen to this very informative session here. (LINK)

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The future is never far away, and as regular readers of my Beware The Future posts will understand, if we plan on being in this game for the long haul we need to, if not predict the future, at least anticipate and be ready for it.

The 2016 Tech Trend report is out and while the whole thing is worth snuggling down in bed with, Joe Wikert has thoughtfully been through it and picked out a few key areas pertinent to the future of publishing.

Read Wikert’s summary here, where there is also a link to the full report.

Wikert’s perspective is of course that of Big Pub, not indie authors, but while we indies may not have the financial muscle of the big players we do have other advantages – speed and agility to experiment – and we can partner with third parties to get in on many of these future developments.

The future will happen whether we like it or not. Change and disruption will happen in our cosy indie-ebook-author lives whether we embrace it or bury our heads in the sand.

If we’re on our last legs and don’t plan on being a writer in the 2020s and beyond, then anticipating and preparing for the future is something we can afford not to do.

For the rest of us the future is our biggest challenge, because change and disruption will happen, and in a far faster and more furious pattern than we’ve experienced this past few years with the so-called ebook revolution, when the only big change was print to ebook.

The real digital revolution is still in first gear. (LINK to Joe Wikert post.)

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On a personal note, for those intrigued my my Third World life here in West Africa, my June and July Gambia Diaries are currently holding #1 and #2 place in category in the free charts on Amazon.

 

1-2-in-niche

These short essays are available free from all good ebook retailers.

Given these monthly ebooks are the only two free titles in this category I’m in the interesting position whereby over the coming months I’ll hold the top five, top ten and eventually top twenty spots in category. And in just over eight years I’ll have the top 100!

For anyone wondering, I am able to list on Amazon without price-matching or being exclusive by uploading via StreetLib.

 

For daily news and discussion about the global indie publishing scene join this lively Facebook Group.

 

 

Digital Libraries – Our Best Bet For International Reach

BiBF2016

I’ve covered the value of OverDrive and like digital library suppliers many times here, but it’s worth revisiting once more in mind OverDrive’s presence at the Beijing Book Fair last week.

From the OverDrive blog: (LINK)

“Over the last several years, OverDrive has made a significant investment to increase the amount of global content available for our library and school partners. We now offer 35,000+ Chinese titles from over 500 publishers in our online catalog, Marketplace, both in the U.S. and internationally. Additionally, Marketplace now features hundreds of thousands of titles from publishers in 63 countries and we add new titles each month in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese as well as Japanese, German, Spanish, Polish and many more languages. Titles include bestselling eBooks and audiobooks written in the native language as well as titles translated from English.”

But it’s not just about selling Chinese content in China. it’s about selling Chinese and other foreign language content globally.
From the Over Drive blog again, taking Chinese titles as an example,

“Libraries have responded by creating curated collections of community language content. Toronto Public Library, Los Angeles Public Library and Seattle Public Library all provide examples of digital collections featuring thousands of Chinese titles.”

This is where the true value of digital libraries for foreign-language content lies for us internationalist indies: accessing ex-pat and immigrant communities around the world that still want to read in their home language.

Yes, a Chinese reader in Toronto or Los Angeles could go to the Kindle CA or US store, but Amazon has less than 2,000 Chinese language titles, compared to OverDrive’s 35,000.

Many languages offered by OverDrive are simply not supported by Amazon’s Kindle store yet.

And just to add Fiberead does get our Chinese translations into OverDrive.

In other international library news, Axiell has partnered with Odlio to expand digital content offering to libraries. (LINK)

Odilo partnered with Gardners late last year to build its content catalogue.

For those targetting Latin America Odilio is a particularly good bet, and a good reason to be with Smashwords, which partnered with Odilo at end of 2015.

And also a must for those targetting that part of the world is the Latin American ebook subscription service Nubleer, which is accessible through StreetLib. (LINK)

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This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group.

Click HERE to see the original post and join the IIA Group, your guide to going global.

The International Indie Author
Looking at the bigger picture.

 

James Patterson Book Shots, Sachet Marketing and the Perils of the Look Inside Feature.

DeadHeat

I follow James Patterson with interest – not so much for the reading as for the presentation and innovation.

Patterson didn’t get to be the world’s biggest-selling author – bigger than Rowling –by hiding his books away from public view and sticking to safe bet formats.

His latest Book Shots project – titles of approx. 150 pages written for the new world of mobile consumers – is designed to chase reluctant readers for whom a full length title of 300 or 500 pages is a daunting prospect.

Stories at the speed of life, as they are cleverly branded.

But he takes that one step further still with his Dead Heat Book Shot, which with perfect timing is set in the Rio 2016 Olympics and released to coincide. And this is a 150 page standard Book Shot delivered in four parts, of just 35-40 pages each, and in the UK retailing at just 49p (a full Book Shot retails at £1.99 GBP).

Whatever we may think of the actual writing, we have to admire the packaging, marketing and timing.

Yes, we can all find things to complain about in the storylines, but Patterson isn’t pretending to be Shakespeare.

Patterson is writing for the twenty-first century mass-consumer that wants reading entertainment they can slot between the rest of their busy lives. Entertainment that can compete with binge-video streaming, music and games, or can be read while multi-tasking in the supermarket queue or waiting for the kids to come out of school.

Patterson – far more so than Rowling – is at the top of his game. His main focus is crime thrillers and mysteries – my preferred genres – so I’ll be buying all the Book Shots over the next few months and reading them not for entertainment (I like Patterson’s tabloid style, but not that much!) but to analyse as a fellow author and work out what it is that keeps Patterson so far ahead of his nearest competitors, year in, year out.

Serialising his short books like this is one great way of reaching new readers, adding new discovery points and standing out from the crowd. Just a shame that the Look Inside feature on Amazon stops before the actual story starts.

Serialising our self-published works came in for some bad press thanks to some indies trying to scam KU by chopping up larger books to gain the pot payout, but in principle serialising our work – not just new titles but existing works – is a great way of reaching new readers.

Why?

• we can keep down our up-front risk cost to the reader down – 49p is less of a risk than £1.99 to get started on the new Patterson four part series, and if we do like it we don’t pay more for buying the rest afterwards.
• if we are serialising old works then there is no delay for readers who do like the first to get the next. It’s just a click away.
• Patterson’s Book Shot in full is just one more title in his portfolio. Just one more discover point. By chopping into four and offering four separate parts or an option to buy the book in full Patterson adds five discover points. Five more chances of a reader coming across his works and getting hooked.
• it needn’t cost us a fortune in extra bespoke covers. Patterson uses the same cover for all four titles, just the edition number changes. And we can see, the volume number is big and bold to make sure it stands out on the thumbnail images.

Which is one lesson I’ve learned from Patterson’s Book Shots already.

For my Sherlock For Kids and Easy-English Sherlock series I use the same base cover design for maximum branding, but the thumbnails do need close inspection to see what is what. So I’ll be looking at some sort of additional cover feature to differentiate the covers in thumbnail viewing mode.

At a broader level I already have my flagship title Sugar & Spice available as a full book or in three parts, with the first free courtesy of StreetLib (the only way to get indie titles into Amazon at $0.00 without being price-matched or in Select). And I’m looking to extend that experiment to other titles.

Next year I’ll be starting on my full-length Classics For Kids titles, with a re-telling of the Sherlock full length titles, some Shakespeare titles and an easy-read version of my favourite Austen novel, Pride & Prejudice, releasing those as serialised parts.

Beyond that there are distributors who specialise in sachet-marketing for the mobile reader.

Juggernaut in India, Pigeonhole in the UK and Germany, and Tapas in the US immediately spring to mind.

I know one IIA Group member already has some titles on Tapas, and when the time is right hopefully will come along and share the experience. I almost signed up with Tapas earlier this year, but real-life got in the way. I’ll be trying again soon.

Going wide is about much more than just being in as many retailer as possible. It’s about making our products appeal to as many people as possible.

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This post first appeared in the International Indie Author Facebook Group.

Click HERE to see the original post and join the IIA Group, your guide to going global.

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